Cloud Trends

This Chart From IBM Explains Why Cloud Computing Is Such A Game-Changer

Grazed from BusinessInsider.  Author: Julie Bort.

All of the industry's biggest tech players are going gaga chasing the cloud-computing market these days:

  •     Cisco just vowed to spend $1 billion to build a new cloud to compete with Amazon's Web Services.
  • Microsoft spent about $8 billion on cloud computing R&D in 2011 and spends billions more each year on its cloud data centers in 16 regions around the world.
  • IBM is spending $7 billion to beef up its cloud.
  • Oracle is in the process of building a cloud, too, with parts of it already being used by beta testers, CEO Larry Ellison recently said...

How Can You Measure a Cloud?

Grazed from MSPMentor.  Author: Michael Brown.

Return on investment (ROI) has been a common performance measurement tool for companies for decades.  However, now it’s come to the attention of numerous companies that perhaps a new variation of ROI will be needed to accompany the arrival of cloud computing.   From this piece over at Forbes:  “A new survey of 350 senior IT executives finds 16 percent see measuring ROI as a hurdle to their cloud computing implementations”

Traditional ROI is based upon the hard monetary return on the purchase and use of products or services.  However, the long term gains from the cloud are not always so easily calculated in a purely financial way...

How Boeing is using the cloud

Grazed from ITWorld. Author: Brandon Butler.

There's a lot of talk about the cloud, but how are businesses really using it? This week at Interop, Boeing's chief cloud strategist, David Nelson, outlined a couple of ways the aircraft manufacturer is not only using the public cloud, but combining that that with on-premises virtualized workloads to create a hybrid environment. The results are applications that Nelson says run more efficiently, are less expensive and serve the needs of Boeing better than if the company had done it all in-house.

Nelson first described an application the company has developed that tracks all of the flight paths that planes take around the world. Boeing's sales staff uses it to help sell aircraft showing how a newer, faster one could improve operations. The app incorporates both historical and real-time data, which means there are some heavy workloads...

From outer space storage to the "Northern Bytes": The best cloudy April Fool stories

Grazed from CloudTech. Author: Editorial Staff.

It’s a tradition as old as the hills, from the BBC’s scoop on spaghetti trees in 1957 to Google’s Pokemon Maps earlier today. Not surprisingly the hype around cloud has prompted a few firms to try their own spoof stories on April Fool's Day. Here are three of CloudTech’s favourites.

Digital Science, a technology division of Macmillan Science and Education, posted worrying findings this morning that “the computing cloud is drifting towards the North Pole.”

In a blog post entitled ‘Cloud computing suffers a major blow’, the company has evidence to suggest that “global warming and the changes thus caused in the Jet Stream pose a danger to ‘the cloud’.”...

How to manage inflated cloud computing expectations

Grazed from ZDNet.  Author: Joe McKendrick.

The crew in the engine room of the Titanic really did a fantastic job of delivering top performance and keeping things running efficiently.  But the ultimate success of the voyage depended on the ship's crew up above -- steering things safely in the right direction, taking advantage of all information available to them. IT, in many ways, is tasked with running the engine room, but then gets blamed when the ship runs into trouble.

The Titanic analogy came to mind when reading Philippe Abdoulaye's account of a hypothetical (and likely composite) company that does all the right things with IT, and gets great results with its implementation. But the company is still running aground, and everyone is looking to IT, wondering why things aren't going as planned.  The good news is unlike the engine room crew of the ill-fated Titanic, IT leaders are in a position to influence the new course of the business -- but they can't do it alone...

Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta: On-ramp to cloud computing

Grazed from ZDNet. Author: Dan Kusnetzky.

I seldom comment on beta test software until it is a released product. I thought, however, that the direction Red Hat is taking for its KVM-based Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) 3.4 beta made it worth publishing a comment.

What Red Hat has to say about RHEV 3.4
New features in Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta include stronger OpenStack integration, enterprise network capabilities enhancements, and advanced manageability of the entire stack.

OpenStack Support and Integration
Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta strengthens and simplifies the provisioning and sharing of networking resources used by both traditional and cloud-enabled workloads through OpenStack Networking (Neutron) integration. The beta release offers enhancements that improve the security and scalability of Neutron provisioned networks. Additionally, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization 3.4 Beta supports open vSwitch and its software-defined networking (SDN) capabilities...

2014 Cloud Trends Outlook - Future of Cloud Services

Grazed from TalkinCloud. Author: Asher Baig.

We talk about the “cloud” today just like we used to talk about the “Internet” back in 1996. Now the Internet is an integral part of our lives and we hardly even use the word—we talk about the applications and services it enables, such as web applications and services (we get more of our information from the Internet than anything else), instant messaging and Internet telephony.

Cloud is going through the similar rapid adoption. Cloud adoption is growing at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of over 40 percent per year. Three years from now we won’t even talk about the “cloud”—we'll talk about the applications and services it enables, such as Office 365, Google Apps, Salesforce.com, BCDR, mobility and file sync and share...

Nearly half of enterprise cloud projects past trial phrase, Microsoft claims

Grazed from BusinessCloudNews. Author: Jonathan Brandon.

Research commissioned by Microsoft and published Wednesday suggests nearly half of organisations using cloud services have moved beyond initial pilot phases, and 32 per cent of enterprises articulating and implementing clear cloud computing strategies within their organisations despite concerns around data protection and security. But the findings also suggest that pervasive concerns around security, while certainly a challenge for cloud service providers and enterprises, may also be a boon for other players.

The research, which includes interviews and survey responses of over 2,000 IT decision-makers working in business of all sizes in eleven countries reveals that over 45 per cent of those that participated claim to be well beyond the pilot phase of implementing cloud services within their organisations...

Fusion PPT CEO to be Featured Guest Speaker on Hybrid Clouds On The Enterprise Cloud Site Radio Broadcast

Grazed from PRWeb. Author: PR Announcement.

Fusion PPT, a recognized strategy and technology consulting firm, announced today that CEO Michael Biddick will be a featured guest speaker on The Enterprise Cloud Site monthly Radio Show to share his advice about “Strategies for Success With Your Hybrid Cloud.” Biddick will join The Enterprise Cloud Site community as a guest on the show on at 1PM ET on Thursday, March 27th, 2014. Biddick, an expert in the field of cloud computing who has authored a book on “Federal Cloud Computing” and written over 50 articles on cloud-related topics, will provide his insight on how to make a hybrid cloud work for your organization and what organizations are really doing with hybrid clouds.

The cloud-enabled enterprise is continuously and rapidly evolving, challenging established IT providers, and transforming IT as we now know it. Rather than asking whether it is a good idea to move to the cloud, for many organizations it is now a matter of when to move, and how to utilize the cloud's abundant resources to increase productivity and outpace competition...

Bare Metal Clouds at Midsize Firms

Grazed from Midsize Insider. Author: Marissa Tejada.

Bare metal clouds are addressing performance and security issues with which IT professionals are often challenged. What exactly are these "metal" clouds? A recent article from ZDNet explains that bare metal cloud computing services are physical servers that follow the standard cloud model; they are built on demand and billed by the hour. This model can be an attractive option for growing firms looking for a flexible cloud solution that features a dedicated cloud server to address specific business needs.

Metal-Minded

Standard virtual machine (VM) cloud computing can eat up too much abstract memory and CPU space, which can affect performance. Another option is bare metal, which is an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) technology combining a mix of custom-designed hardware that can potentially provide better performance and security than VM clouds...