OpenStack

Huawei and Canonical Integrate OpenStack and CloudFabric

Grazed from Huawei and Canonical



Huawei and Canonical today announced they are expanding their cooperation in enterprise and telecom clouds to announce that they have completed the integration of CloudFabric Cloud Data Center Network Solution and Canonical's Ubuntu OpenStack. The joint solution integrates the Agile Controller, Huawei's SDN controller, with Ubuntu OpenStack to improve the efficiency of deploying and maintaining multiple data center networks. A large number of controller nodes can be deployed in minutes to interoperate with the cloud platform quickly. Enterprises or telecom cloud platforms that are using or plan to use Ubuntu OpenStack platform can directly connect their OpenStack platform with the Agile Controller to enable quick, flexible service deployment and integration in multiple data centers.

IBM, Red Hat collaborate to accelerate Hybrid Cloud Adoption with OpenStack

Grazed from IBM and Red Hat

IBM and Red Hat, Inc. announced a strategic collaboration designed to help enterprises benefit from the OpenStack platform's speed and economics while more easily extending their existing Red Hat virtualized and cloud workloads to the IBM Private Cloud.

As part of this new collaboration, IBM has become a Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider, giving clients greater confidence that they can use Red Hat OpenStack Platform and Red Hat Ceph Storage on IBM Private Cloud when the offering launches for general availability at the end of March 2017.

Additionally, as part of the agreement, Red Hat Cloud Access will be available for IBM Cloud by the end of Q2 2017, allowing Red Hat customers to move eligible, unused Red Hat Enterprise Linux subscriptions from their data centre to a public, virtualized cloud environment in IBM Cloud Data Centres worldwide.

Red Hat expert: OpenStack May Not Be As Complex As You Think

Grazed from InformationWeek.  Author: Charles Babcock

OpenStack is perhaps best known for its complexity. It’s not a single open source project but a framework meant to contain several projects with the different pieces able to work together. Different teams are working, each at their own pace, on each subsystem.

There's Cinder for block storage and Swift for object storage, Quantum for networking and Nova for compute. There's also Keystone for identity management and Glance for system image management, along with Horizon for dashboard monitoring information.
 

53 new things to look for in OpenStack Ocata

Grazed from Mirantis. Author:

With a shortened development cycle, you’d think we’d have trouble finding 53 new features of interest in OpenStack Ocata, but with so many projects (more than 60!) under the Big Tent, we actually had a little bit of trouble narrowing things down. We did a live webinar talking about 157 new features, but here’s our standard 53. (Thanks to the PTLs who helped us out with weeding it down from the full release notes!)

Nova (OpenStack Compute Service)

  1. VM placement changes: The Nova filter scheduler will now use the Placement API to filter compute nodes based on CPU/RAM/Disk capacity.
  2. High availability: Nova now uses Cells v2 for all deployments; currently implemented as single cells, the next release, Pike, will support multi-cell clouds.
  3. Neutron is now the default networking option.
  4. Upgrade capabilities: Use the new ‘nova-status upgrade check’ CLI command to see what’s required to upgrade to Ocata.

The OpenStack Community Releases Ocata, 15th Release of Cloud Computing Software

Grazed from OpenStack

The OpenStack community today released Ocata, the 15th version of the most widely deployed open source infrastructure software. The Ocata release cycle was a one-time, shorter cycle focused on stabilization, including scalability and performance of the core compute and networking services. Ocata also brought greater support for container-based application frameworks at the networking layer, as well as containerization of OpenStack services for easier deployment and upgrade management, treating OpenStack as a microservice application.

During this release cycle, the OpenStack community has witnessed the growing multi-cloud trend, where enterprises are employing a more sophisticated workload allocation strategy across public and private clouds. In particular, OpenStack users are seeing significant cost savings and compliance benefits with OpenStack private clouds. A new model of remotely managed private clouds has also emerged that makes it easier for users to experience the benefits of public cloud in an environment dedicated to them.

OpenStack continues to grow its support for container-based application frameworks and deployment tools, with Kolla (containerized OpenStack services), Kuryr (bridging container networking and storage with OpenStack) and Zun (container management) projects seeing the most contributor growth in the release cycle. Other container-related enhancements include:

Kontron partners with Canonical to enable universal OpenStack-based virtualized services

Grazed from Kontron

Kontron, a global provider of cloud and carrier-class integrated infrastructure platforms, announced today the launch of a commercially available SYMKLOUD OpenStack Platform. In collaboration with Canonical, Kontron exercised a complete validation of Ubuntu OpenStack on SYMKLOUD hardware, and will fully support and manage the platform's life cycle in alignment with each new open source software release, starting with Mitaka.

This represents a major commitment by Kontron to radically simplify the evaluating, buying and deploying of production-grade OpenStack platforms. For communication service providers, cloud and hosting providers, and enterprises who build private clouds, this fulfills many market expectations of an integrated OpenStack platform that is - deployable in hours not days, priced at a reasonable entry point, and is maintained as a truly open source platform without vendor lock-in.

The hardware-software integration story

Understanding OpenStack's Success

Grazed from Linux Journal.  Author: Petros Koutoupis

At the time I got into the data storage industry, I was working with and developing RAID and JBOD (Just a Bunch Of Disks) controllers for 2 Gbit Fibre Channel Storage Area Networks (SAN). This was a time before "The Cloud". Things were different—so were our users. There was comfort in buying from a single source or single vendor. In an ideal world, it should all work together, harmoniously, right? And when things go awry, that single vendor should be able to solve every problem within that entire deployment.

That is why, enterprise companies typically bought from a single storage vendor and invested deeply in them. You either bought HP, Dell, EMC, Sun Microsystems or NetApp, which also was successfully carving a new market in Network Attached Storage (NAS). For example, once an EMC shop, always an EMC shop. Hundreds of thousands to even millions of dollars were spent to ensure that you were enabled for high availability, fault tolerance, training, support and more. Again, through that single vendor.

Containers May Work With, Or In Place Of, Private Cloud

Grazed from InformationWeek.  Author: Charles Babcock

Some investors in private cloud say OpenStack is attractive to them because it can serve as a platform on which to manage containers. Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the Openstack Foundation, made that argument recently and PayPal, Comcast, and other major OpenStack implementers have suggested the same thing.

In support of his position, Bryce referred to the 451 Research report of Jan. 10, OpenStack and Containers: Confusion, Complement and Competition, which cited the efforts within the OpenStack project to accommodate containers and manage them at a large scale. These include the Zun, Magnum and Heat projects within OpenStack for managing containers. OpenStack and Containers is only available behind a 451 Research paywall.
 

New 'Open Source Days' Program Launches as Part of OpenStack Summit in Boston

Grazed from OpenStack

The OpenStack Summit-the must-attend open infrastructure event-will feature a new program called "Open Source Days," happening May 8-11 in Boston at the Hynes Convention Center. Open Source Days bring together adjacent open source communities with the goals to improve collaboration and technical integration throughout the diverse ecosystem of open source projects that OpenStack users rely upon.

Community members from Ceph, Kubernetes, Cloud Foundry, Open vSwitch, OPNFV, OpenSwitch, Ansible, OpenContrail and more will each host their own Open Source Day during the OpenStack Summit. The Open Source Days will essentially be a dedicated content track to present software roadmaps, user stories and important cross-community roundtables.

Google, Harvard, China Mobile to Speak at the OpenStack Summit Boston

Grazed from OpenStack Foundation

Today the OpenStack Foundation announced that Brian Stevens of Google, Mercè Crosas of The Institute for Quantitative Social Science (IQSS) at Harvard University and Junwei Lu of China Mobile are among the speakers committed to the next OpenStack Summit, the must-attend open infrastructure event, taking place May 8-11 at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston. OpenStack users at Bloomberg, eBay and the US Army Cyber School are also among the first round of confirmed speakers. The call for presentations is open through February 6, and the full agenda will be published in March.

More than 6,000 participants from 60+ countries are expected to attend the OpenStack Summit to discuss how open infrastructure is helping companies increase agility and save money as software becomes more strategic to their business. Headline sponsors are Intel, Mirantis, Deutsche Telekom and Red Hat.

Stevens, vice president of cloud platforms at Google, will discuss how open source is the vehicle for hybrid cloud and is also enabling new use cases such as machine learning. Crosas, chief data science and technology officer at Harvard IQSS (Institute for Quantitative and Social Science), will discuss the Cloud Dataverse collaboration with the Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC) to host datasets, supporting thousands of researchers at more than 500 worldwide institutions using Dataverse, in the MOC's OpenStack cloud.