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NTT America adds storage to its enterprise cloud offering

Grazed from FierceTelecom.  Author: Sean Buckley.

NTT America (NYSE: NTT) is following up its U.S. cloud computing debut with its new offering Cloud Files, a cloud-based storage solution.

Cloud Computing Is More Likely for Low-Risk Systems: Report

Grazed from eWeek.  Author:  Don E. Sears.

Convirture Aims to Be VMware for Linux Data Centers

Grazed from eWeek.  Author:  Chris Preimesberger.

VMware's ESX hypervisor and its vCenter control suite are thought to be operating in more than 80 percent of all enterprise IT systems. And some IT people believe that number is too conservative.

Microsoft's Hyper-V, still getting its bearings in the market, is growing in use but its market share is still mired in the single digits. That leaves 10 to 15 percent of all the rest deploying other virtual systems middleware, mainly the open-source XenServer and KVM hypervisors that come bundled in most Linux distributions.

Nasuni Looks to Educate SMBs about Data Security in the Cloud

Grazed from ChannelPro SMB.  Author: Editorial Staff.

Cloud-based storage innovator Nasuni is looking to provide SMBs with better information about security in the clouds. The company’s latest white paper on the subject, “Understanding Security in Cloud Storage,” covers some of the basics of securely storing data over the Internet.

Maintaining Strategic Control over Cloud Computing

Grazed from IT Business Edge.  Author:  Michael Vizard.

Theoretically at least, there’s no way an internal IT organization building out its own private cloud could be as cost competitive as a public cloud computing service. After all, the economies of scale vastly favor the public cloud service.


But  to maintain strategic control over their IT resources, many IT organizations will still need to build out some private cloud platform.

What Insurers Need to Know to Develop a Cloud Computing Strategy

Grazed from Insurance and Technology.  Author: Jeurgen Weiss.

Cloud computing has gained a lot of awareness lately. In fact, cloud computing was ranked as the top technology priority by a sample of 76 insurance CIOs who participated in Gartner's annual CIO survey.

Gartner defines cloud computing as a style of computing in which scalable and elastic IT-enabled capabilities are delivered as a service using Internet technologies to multiple customers. "Scalable and elastic" means that the cloud services scale on demand to add or remove resources as needed. The service -- including software and data -- resides on hardware that the customer doesn't own.

5 Critical Cloud Components

Grazed from Insurance and Technology.  Author: Mike Sciole.

While I'm not sure any core application could be sourced externally without segmentation -- which defeats the purpose of cloud computing -- there are a number of variables that insurers need to contemplate in the design of an internal cloud or for the use of external clouds. The internal or external cloud must possess the following components in order to function as desired:

1. Availability. The internal or external cloud must achieve a Data Center Tier 4 availability rating as specified by either the Uptime Institute or by TIA-942 standards.

Not Ready for Prime Time

Grazed from Insurance and Technology.  Author: Gary Plotkin.

In some ways, cloud computing is somewhat immature. It's a bit of a solution looking for a problem. In general, the property and casualty industry is underserved by software.

The benefits of cloud are about ease of use, quick rollout and ubiquity around the world. There's a physical advantage. And if I'm using someone else's hardware and software, there's a nice capital relief for me.

Zeus Makes Cloud Balancing And Bursting A Reality

Grazed from Network Computing.  Author:  Mauri.

Why does broadband speed vary so much?

Grazed from BBC.  Author: Jane Wakefield.

If you are a night owl who enjoys surfing between the hours of 4am and 6am and are fortunate enough to live on top of a telephone exchange then you are probably very happy with your broadband speeds.

But the majority of people in the UK are not getting the broadband services they signed up for, according to a comprehensive speed report by regulator Ofcom.

The survey found that for DSL services advertised as being "up to" 20Mbps, only 2% of customers got speeds in the range of 14-20Mbps. Of the others, 32% were getting a 8-14Mbps service and 65%, 8Mbps or less.