Cloud Adoption

Oracle Adds On-Demand Computing to its Cloud Service

Grazed from The Wall Street Journal. Author: Steve D. Jones.

After once dismissing cloud computing as “gibberish,” Oracle Corp. ORCL +0.64%Chief Executive Larry Ellison announced three new features for its cloud service at a customer conference in San Francisco.

Oracle will add infrastructure as a service to the Oracle Public Cloud, putting the enterprise software company in competition with pioneers Amazon.com Inc. AMZN -0.63% and Google Inc. GOOG +0.59% The Redwood Shores-based company also announced it will begin building and operating cloud services inside client data centers and a new version of its Exadata database machine with built in memory so it won’t have to rely on external storage...

The US and Europe - divided by a common Cloud cause?

Grazed from BusinessCloud9. Author: Stuart Lauchlan.

Last week’s formal announcement of the European Commission’s Cloud Computing strategy confirmed one thing: the Eurocrats in Brussels are leaning towards ‘a European Cloud’ in a big way and intend to achieve it through a combination of legislation, unification and standardisation. That has two immediate implications as national European government strategies - described by the Commission as not enough to achieve full potential of the Cloud – work out where they sit in this new push, while non-EU providers and governments, most notably in the US, must decide whether Brussels actions will lead to more open or more closed markets.

So what has the reaction been on both sides of the Pond to the forthcoming European Cloud? “The Cloud Industry Forum is keen to support positive credible action that encourages the adoption of Cloud Services and in that spirit the notion of aligning European member activity under a common ‘framework’ is sensible if it covers the truly practical issues that can impact adoption,” comments Andy Burton, chair of the CIF...

Enterprise IT managers worry about cloud security

Grazed from FierceEnterpriseCommunication. Author: Fred Donovan.

Whether it is a regulator threatening fines or a CEO fuming about a data breach, IT managers are well aware of the enterprise security risks of adopting cloud computing. The latest news to drive home this point was a recent statement by the UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) that companies face fines if they do not secure customer data held by third-party cloud providers.

UK companies are responsible for securing customer data whether they store it internally or externally, the ICO stressed. "The law on outsourcing data is very clear. As a business, you are responsible for keeping your data safe. You can outsource some of the processing of that data, as happens with cloud computing, but how that data is used and protected remains your responsibility," said Simon Rice, ICO's technology policy advisor...

Avnet, Amazon Web Services Partner on Cloud Services

Grazed from Talkin Cloud.  Author: Joe Panetierri.

Avnet Technology Solutions (NYSE: AVT) and Amazon Web Services (NASDAQ: AMZN) have inked a cloud computing partnership to empower VARs, MSPs, ISVs and other channel partners, Talkin’ Cloud has learned. The cloud relationship will initially involve Oracle (NASDAQ: ORCL) database services and Riverbed Technology (NASDAQ: RVBD) Whitewater cloud storage gateway solutions. But take a closer look and it’s clear Avnet and Amazon intend to explore of additional cloud solution bundles for Avnet’s channel partners.

The Avnet Cloud Solutions initiative (unveiled in May 2012) seems to be gaining momentum with industry heavyweights. Instead of simply reselling SaaS offerings to channel partners, Avnet has been creating custom bundles (backed by a cloud support team) for its partner ecosystem...

Hey IT — embrace, don't stifle, developers' flight to cloud

Grazed from GigaOM.  Author: Bart Copeland.

Shadow IT, or dark ops, can be scary to IT departments, but there are reasons developers go rogue. Instead of fighting their urge to flea to the cloud, make it easy for them to use cloud resources in a responsible way.  You’re stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic. No one’s moving. It’s hot, the air conditioner is busted and next to you is a tempting escape … a wide-open breakdown lane. Sure, you could move over and jump ahead. You’d get where you wanted to go faster, but you’d be breaking the rules.

Shadow IT projects crop up in much the same way. Gridlocked by the processes and protocols imposed by IT management, developers very often give in to the temptation of moving their projects outside where they can progress faster. These “shadow IT” or “dark ops” which happen when developers go outside the firewall — spinning up and provisioning their work on beyond-the-firewall cloud resources to support time-sensitive project delivery. These efforts typically happen without the knowledge of IT (or accounting) departments...

Oracle Readies Cloud Blitz With New Partner Specialization, Integration Programs

Grazed from CRN.  Author: Chad Berndston.

Oracle (NSDQ:ORCL) plans to attack the cloud computing opportunity with a slew of new channel offerings for its 25,000 partners, including programs that will designate specialized Oracle partners as cloud builders and others that will pay partners referral fees and extra incentives for their cloud integration expertise.

It's the latest in a series of cloud-centric moves from the software giant, for which a software-and-services strategy is seen as increasingly important as its hardware business continues to erode. The launch is actually five distinct channel offerings that Judson Althoff, Oracle senior vice president, worldwide alliances and channels, is scheduled to unveil to partners during an Oracle Partner Network (OPN) keynote on Sunday -- the channel kickoff to Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco...

The Old Law of Cloud Computing

Grazed from Who's Who Legal. Author: Clive Gringas.

To appreciate why the “cloud” is the future of computing, one must understand a law of economics coined in 1890 and learn what happened around the same time at 57 Holborn Viaduct in London, England. In 1890, Alfred Marshall finished a decade’s work. His eight-volume Principles of Economics was finally ready. Those who read the fourth volume were introduced, for the first time, to the concept of “economies of scale”. Marshall’s analysis, then novel, was that in some trades “in which a man gains no very great new economies by increasing the scale of his production, it often happens that a business remains of about the same size for many years, if not for many generations.” These could be contrasted with trades.

“in which a large business can command very important advantages, which are beyond the reach of a small business. A new man, working his way up in such a trade, has to set his energy and flexibility, his industry and care for small details, against the broader economies of his rivals with their larger capital, their higher specialization of machinery and labour, and their larger trade connection. If then he can double his production, and sell at anything like his old rate, he will have more than doubled his profits. This will raise his credit with bankers and other shrewd lenders; and will enable him to increase his business further, and to attain yet further economies, and yet higher profits: and this again will increase his business and so on. It seems at first that no point is marked out at which he need stop.”...

Top 5 Cloud Computing Trends Of The Future

Grazed from CloudTweaks. Author: Gregory Msungu.

Cloud computing as a technology trend has caught up fast in recent years. It has revolutionized IT in a way never seen before. It has clearly changed how the traditional software works for businesses. This has many benefits, considering many of the former models are rather physical, coupled with expensive licenses. Cloud computing is a dynamic technology and the following are some of the trends that experts and analysts have identified.

1. Cloud computing is scaling investment value

Cloud computing streamlines how software, business processes, and services are accessed. More than ever before, this is helping businesses scale operations and optimize their investments. This is not only through lower costs, efficient business models, or greater agility in operations. It has a lot to do with how businesses use it to optimize their investments. In the same breadth, businesses are scaling into more innovation with their IT capacity. This will certainly help them make more investments and draw corporate income...

Cloud Computing: The dark side of OpenStack

Grazed from GigaOM. Author: Barb Darrow.

Buyer beware when it comes to adopting OpenStack — or any open-source cloud — according to a newly released Gartner report. Long story short: evaluate OpenStack just like you’d assess a commercial offering, cautions analyst Lydia Leong. Just weeks before for the big OpenStack Summit, a new report cautions prospective users not to buy into the hype around this (or any) open-source cloud computing platform.

Gartner Research VP Lydia Leong suggests that prospective users proceed with eyes wide open and recognize that OpenStack, while promoted as an end to vendor lock-in can represent its own sort of “ecosystem lock-in.” She recommends the use of a third-party cloud management tool or API library that will work with multiple clouds...

Avnet Study Finds that Style over substance has caused "Cloud confusion"

Grazed from ARN. Author: Patrick Budmar.

Is the hype for the Cloud justified? If you ask Avnet A/NZ services general manager, Adam Chicktong, it is both a yes and no.

“I say 'yes' because the technology has advanced enough to enable this particular model of computing to be leveraged and consumerised in a way that was impossible before,” he said. The benefits of the Cloud typically include reduced costs, scalability, moving Capex to Opex, redundancy, and on-demand compute power as some of the advantages. “It has enabled business’ to develop and grow into areas they would not have been able to 15 years ago,” Chicktong said...